Ghana

Kumasi General Hospital

At Kumasi General Hospital in Ghana, babies are screened for sickle cell disease. The inherited blood disorder can be life-threatening, but only about 4% of babies in Ghana are currently tested for the disease. In 2019, Novartis launched a collaboration with the Sickle Cell Foundation of Ghana and the Ministry of Health of Ghana that aims to expand newborn screening and improve access to treatment.

A nurse takes a blood sample from a baby as part of a newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in Ghana. (Photo)

A nurse takes a blood sample from a baby as part of a newborn screening program for sickle cell disease in Ghana.

Kwaku Ohene-Frempong (left), a physician who earned his medical degree at Yale University in the US and has devoted his life to treating people with sickle cell disease, speaks with a mother at Kumasi General Hospital in Ghana (Photo)

Kwaku Ohene-Frempong (left), a physician who earned his medical degree at Yale University in the US and has devoted his life to treating people with sickle cell disease, speaks with a mother at Kumasi General Hospital in Ghana. Dr. Ohene-Frempong is head of the Sickle Cell Foundation of Ghana and program coordinator for the National Newborn Screening Program for Sickle Cell Disease. He is working with Novartis and the Ministry of Health of Ghana on a program to expand early diagnosis and treatment of the disease in his home country. To learn more about Dr. Ohene-Frempong and the collaboration in Ghana, click here.

In Accra, Ghana, John Dzido holds his son Caleb, 11, who has suffered a series of strokes due to sickle cell disease. (Photo)

In Accra, Ghana, John Dzido holds his son Caleb, 11, who has suffered a series of strokes due to sickle cell disease. To learn more about Mr. Dzido and his son, as well as efforts to expand early diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell disease in Ghana, click here.

Zipline (Photo)

As part of the collaboration, Novartis is working with Zipline,  an innovative logistics company, to help deliver medicines to remote areas. Workers at Zipline’s distribution centers receive orders from healthcare workers, quickly pack critical medical supplies into distinctive red boxes, and load them into drones to be launched into the sky. After a short flight, the drones drop their precious cargo at hospitals or rural health centers. To learn more about Zipline and our work with them in Ghana, watch the video here.